Harlequin Mills & Boon Medical Romance Novels, Women's Business

Why Romance Heroines are all about Womens’ Rights

  1. Romance heroines never settle for second-best when choosing who they love.
  2. Romance heroines are strong in heart and in mind and in soul—or they end up that way after growing through the conflicts in the story.
  3. Romance heroines, like all strong women, are good role models for our daughters.
  4. Romance heroines don’t obsess over their weight or if their hair looks good. They focus their energy on what is important to them.
  5. Romance heroines believe in the sanctity of a strong and faithful relationship and will accept nothing less.
  6. Romance heroines choose mates who bring out the best in them.
  7. Romance heroines understand and embrace the power in being a woman.
  8. Romance heroines are brave enough to be vulnerable and fall in love.
  9. Romance heroines believe in hope for a happy, healthy future.
  10. Romance heroines gives readers hope that they can be the heroines of their own lives.

As a romance reader, I have been bolstered and encouraged and inspired time after time by the heroines in romance novels. While these are fictional characters, all characters are based on real traits we have in ourselves or we’ve seen in someone else. The women in the medical profession have my highest admiration. When writing Dr Stephanie Montclair, in  THE BABY WHO SAVED DR CYNICAL, I came to realize how strong-willed and strong-spirited these women must be. They must balance sympathy and compassion with the knowledge that what must be done to save a life could hurt, on so many levels.

In THE BABY WHO SAVED DR CYNICAL, Dr. Stephanie Montclair and Dr. Jason Drake are diagnosticians, the doctors of last resort. They have the lowest success rate in the profession because they are the doctors people turn to after everyone else has given up hope. They are strong, brilliant, independent people. Finding their equals is something neither thinks will ever happen for them. Until, one day….

Dr Stephanie Montclair finds in Dr Jason Drake a man who inspires her to be a better woman, just as she inspires him to be a better man. While they rely on each other they also challenge each other to grow. Love makes them vulnerable enough to grow and become more of who they were born to be.


And isn’t that what happily-ever-after relationships are all about? That we all become better people because we love.

THE BABY WHO SAVED DR CYNICAL is available at Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.com for Kindle and BarnesandNoble.com for Nook.

 

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25 thoughts on “Why Romance Heroines are all about Womens’ Rights”

  1. Dear Connie, I love this post. I have three daughters and I often think that I’d be very happy for them to read romances and take the heroines as their role models. In fact, I try to keep in mind when writing my own romances that these books will be read by my daughters as well as by the daughters of other people – by the women of the next generation. I see it as my responsibility to write heroines, heroes and relationships that will have a positive effect on these young minds that are still so easily influenced.
    I’ve just finished reading The Baby Who Saved Dr Cynical and it was such a memorable story. I loved the fact that they are the doctors of last resort. It is such an interesting, fresh speciality. I also adored your characters. If there was a prize for the most unforgettable Medical hero, I would nominate Jason. He was more than a character. He was a living, breathing man – in all his complexity and his sexiness. Well done, what a read! When can we expect the next book? What is it about?

    1. Amelia, you have totally made my day–no, my whole week!
      I grew up in a very strong matriarchal household and all the women in my family read romance. Of course, I gravitate to the stories about strong women. And sometimes those women have to be tested to show their true strength. The independent women who expect and only accept the utmost in respect on the novels inspired the woman I wanted to grow up to be.

      Wow! I am SO pleased you ‘got’ what I wanted to portray in The Baby Who Saved Dr. Cynical. Jason really came on strong in this story. I could hear his thoughts and words and actions in my head and all I had to do was take dictation.

      My next book, Return of the Rebel Surgeon, is out in August 2012. Here’s the scoop on this story: After fifteen years away, Surgeon Cole Lassiter returns to New Orleans for business issues, but finds he left some personal issues behind all those years ago. Thinking he was betrayed and having given up on love, Cole has focused his passion on medicine where he is the best of the best in field.

      Behavioral therapist Bella Allante is raising her autistic teenaged son alone and has everything under control, until Cole Lassiter returns. He is the only man that has ever made her lose control and it seems it could happen again. But she’s not the pliable girl she used to be.
      Last time Cole left town, he broke her heart and left her pregnant with his son. This time, things will be different.

      Thanks for asking!

      1. That sounds super, I can’t wait for August! Interesting to hear how you experienced Jason during the writing process. I’m sure you were in love with him too, or you wouldn’t have been able to make him so dreamy? Do you feel the same about Cole or is it a different ‘relationship’?

  2. FF here. You have NOT been reading the same romances that I have been reading! Oh, they are like that at the end, but they are like everybody I know at the beginning.

  3. This is a fascinating post and it certainly justifies why you do what you do. And I do believe by the time “THE END” shows up the heroines are strong, but not all of them are great role models for our daughters. I can think of several stories that had some pretty weak females and seriously flawed heroines at the beginning of the stories. Even at the end in a couple books I have read the heroine was still pretty flawed at the end. I’m glad you believe these strong women at the ones you write–pardon me as I reserve judgment about the strength of your heroines until I’ve read 30-40 or 50 of your books. 😉

    1. Thanks for the confidence in my that I’ll write 30-40 or 50 books! And yes, Nan, stories are as varied as snowflakes, so not all heroines are heroic. Just as heroic means different things to different people and not all readers have the same standards for heroics. simple example: One reader may be into subtle, steel magnolia strength while another may only recognizes mouthy kick-butt strength as heroic. So many books, so many choices. The romances that hold my interest, and the ones I point my daughter to, (and the ones my mother pointed me to) have strong women, or women who become strong over the course of the story. What’s your favorite/least favorite book?

  4. Hi Connie
    I’ve just picked up a copy of Dr Cynical so after reading this blog I’m looking forward to seeing how these ideals play out in your book. Number 5 is the ideal that is most important to me and lately I’ve been disappointed with HM&B heroes that have been unfaithful to the heroine after marriage or making the heroine pregnant. As these instances have been in books by authors I’ve read and loved for years I find it particularly disappointing. A separation from the heroine for whatever reason is to me no excuse. A man seriously in love shouldn’t want another woman. Heroes ruled by their libido are not strong masculine men but weak pathetic creatures. How can I believe in a HEA with a man who will fail when things aren’t perfect.

    1. No pressure, huh, Fiona? I would love to know what you think of this story. I’m all about respect being the basis for any relationship.

  5. I love your list, Connie. Right on!

    So many of us romance authors assume other people GET what we write about, but sadly there are many readers and naysayers regarding romance who want to distort the picture that is romance novels. Thank you for pointing that out so clearly. 🙂

    1. Thanks Lynne,
      Sadly, I think there are too many people that don’t believe in a healthy loving adult relationship and that’s where the cynicism comes in ( I actually write those kinds of characters sometimes 🙂 ) But maybe, someday, if we keep believing, we’ll convince them….

  6. Hi Connie

    Your next book sounds terrific. I love your list too. I like to write about strong heroines who are facing a difficult time in their lives. My heroines and heros are often less than perfect- but I hope by the end of the book they have managed to bring out the best in each other. The worst thing anyone can say to me is that the heroine was ‘rescued’ by the hero. I like to think if there is any ‘rescuing’ going on it is mutual!

    1. I totally agree about the rescuing thing. That paternal-child relationship doesn’t cut it for me in a romance. Love that you pointed out the ‘less than perfect’ aspect. My heroes and heroines are definitely flawed, but>>as I told my daughter>> you may love a lot of different boys as you date, but the right one for you is the one that brings out the best in you.

  7. Hi Connie, great post. I’m all for a bit of mutual rescuing too – a truly strong hero is someone who is not just able to acknowledge the strength of a heroine, but someone who loves her for those strengths. I always look for the point in the book where the whole (the hero and heroine together) starts to become more than the sum of its parts – for me that’s where the magic starts.

    1. “–where the magic starts” You gave me shivers with that, Annie. Yes, that’s the place in the writing that gives me such happiness!

  8. Great list, Connie. My characters may not start out with the characteristics you listed, but hopefully by the end of the book they’ve grown into them. This is a great way for me to kind of check to make sure they’ve arrived. Thanks!

  9. The Baby that Saved Dr Cynical
    1.Romance heroines never settle for second-best when choosing who they love.
    TICK. Hero Jason is gorgeous and adorable and smart and….
    2.Romance heroines are strong in heart and in mind and in soul—or they end up that way after growing through the conflicts in the story. TICK STephanie is a strong accomplished woman
    3.Romance heroines, like all strong women, are good role models for our daughters. TICK see above
    4.Romance heroines don’t obsess over their weight or if their hair looks good. They focus their energy on what is important to them. TICK (well mostly)
    5.Romance heroines believe in the sanctity of a strong and faithful relationship and will accept nothing less. TICK You betcha baby.
    6.Romance heroines choose mates who bring out the best in them. TICK Purrfect!
    7.Romance heroines understand and embrace the power in being a woman. TICK
    8.Romance heroines are brave enough to be vulnerable and fall in love. TICK (eventually)
    9.Romance heroines believe in hope for a happy, healthy future. TICK (slow start but got there)
    10.Romance heroines gives readers hope that they can be the heroines of their own lives. TICK
    A lovely book that ticks all the right boxes, engages emotionally and leaves you satisfied.

  10. Being able to write about a heroine and hero who are equal in every way is what I love most about writing Medical romances. I absolutely hate wimpy little heroines who gaze adoringly up at the hero and are unable to function without him.
    The women I admire most are strong independent people who run their own lives. My perfect hero is the man who understands this and is able to cope with a woman who has her own views without feeling threatened. It sounds as though your book has hit the mark perfectly and I can’t wait to read it.

    Jennifer.

  11. Connie,
    I love your list. Heroines do take on real people traits that’s way we love to read about them. Your book sound wonderful. I look forward to reading it.

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