Harlequin Mills & Boon Medical Romance Novels, Pets

Love and Loss

(WARNING – This hurt me to write. I apologise if it upsets anyone, but I felt the need to tell the story)

Ten years ago, when our youngest son was four years old, we were struggling to reach him and communicate effectively. His speech was minimal and the words he did say, were often unintelligible, except to me and his Dad.

Back then he hadn’t been diagnosed, though we strongly suspected autism was the case. I was researching autism, trying to find other parents like me, struggling to reach their child and I came across two families, that had brought a dog into their home to try and make a break-through. We’d always had dogs in the house, but hadn’t for a while, after the death of our previous dog, Lucy, a golden labrador.

So we decided the time was right for another.  And bought a fluffy white bundle that looked like a baby polar bear.

thumbnail_IMG_1166

Her name was Daisy and she was a golden retriever.

Goldens are renowned for their gentle spirit, intelligence and capacity for patience and love and we knew that she’d need it. Jack could be furious and physical, lashing out in frustration at not being able to convey his feelings.

Until Daisy and Jack met.

Daisy settled into our home well. Making friends with everybody, including the rather unimpressed cats and our other children, tolerant of all the loud noises and the constant hands that wanted to pat her and stroke her. Jack often lay down on the floor, using her body as a pillow and she would follow him and the others around, making sure they were always in sight, always around.

Jack’s verbal abilities and temper became better. He helped us take Daisy for walks and they would play and run in the surf together and when Jack got tired (which wasn’t easy!) Daisy would continue to play in the water and chase seagulls and sticks and whatever you threw for her.

She became our family dog and entered our hearts so easily with her big, brown eyes and soft, white fur and the way she’d somehow manage to make you pet her, whilst you were watching television or a movie. The way she’d nuzzle her nose under your hand, so that you’d stroke her or give her a belly rub.

She loved physical contact.

She loved us.

You could see it, clearly in her eyes. In the wag of her tail. In the way she’d sit at the window whenever you left the house and stay there until you came back again. The greeting when you came through the door.

She had some funny quirks. She liked rolling in smelly stuff. She liked to dive into dirt just after you’d given her a bath. She liked to rub herself into the grass so hard, she’d give herself a grass bindi – a little green stain in the centre of her forehead. And after breakfast, lunch and dinner, with her belly full, she would roll onto her back and squirm about, as if she were getting a spinal massage, whilst groaning and moaning in joy.

She never barked. She never chewed something she shouldn’t. She often looked guilty for something the other animals had done, as if she were willing to take the blame, but she was always so happy for those cuddles and kisses to let her know that you weren’t mad.

And then, a week ago today, April 20th, I found her lying in the garden. I thought she was sunbathing. The weather was hot, but it was still early morning, so not too bad. But there was something about the way she was lying, that made my inner red flags go up.

As I got closer, I saw her breathing was off and so I immediately checked her gums and they were white. Not the healthy pink they should be and I knew she was either in shock from something, or was suffering internal blood loss. I called the vets and they asked me to rush her in.

The vet, Hannah, could feel a mass in her abdomen, but as they’re a small practice, they didn’t have an ultrasound machine and needed to send her to Portsmouth to get it done at their emergency surgery.

But she wasn’t strong enough for travel. They offered to put her on a drip and get some fluids into her and painkillers in case she was hurting anywhere. She couldn’t stand because her blood pressure had tanked.

They did a chest X-ray, but it only showed that her heart was enlarged. Now stabilised, they asked us if we wanted to see her before they took her to Portsmouth and we all went in and surrounded her with love and affection. Stroking her. Telling her that we loved her. That she had to fight, whatever it was. And then it was time to go.

We sat at home. Jumping every time the phone rang and believe you me the world and his wife suddenly wanted to talk. Random calls. Marketing calls. We tried to be polite, but were probably curt to get them off the phone.

Then the cardiologist rang. Daisy had fluid around her heart and it wasn’t beating properly. The mass in her abdomen was a build up of fluid that her system couldn’t shift. The fluid around her heart could be one of two things. Either a simple infection, in which they could operate to remove the pericardial sac and fluid and she’d be fine, OR, it could be a cancer, in which case, she wouldn’t survive.

We had to give her the chance to live, so we pinned our hopes on it being an infection and gave them permission to operate. The next hour was terrible as we waited. Our children were upset, no-one could eat, our stomachs felt painful and twisted. We didn’t know what to do with ourselves. Keep busy? We couldn’t concentrate on anything, except replaying everything that had happened.

And then the phone rang. The cardiologist had found a massive tumour running through her heart. There was no way she would survive. Did she have our permission to put her to sleep?

Hearts broken, we said yes. We’d wanted a last goodbye. To be there, when it happened, but it would have been too cruel to have woken her, in pain, just so that we could be there. So she was put to sleep.

Our world stopped. We all fell to pieces. There’s a big, Daisy shaped hole in our home. No dog lying in the doorway that we have to step over every time. No dog waiting for us at the bottom of the stairs when we come down in the morning. No-one lifting our hand with a  big, wet nose, for a cuddle.

The sight of her dog bowls in the kitchen had me in floods of tears. Finding her lead in the car, broke me again. Hearing my children sob in their rooms tore me asunder.

This is all so raw. So painful. But I know that we will, in time, be able to talk about her with a smile and bring up happier memories. We will be able to look at photographs of her and feel a good feeling.

She had a good life. She was the happiest dog I know.

RIP Daisy. We will always miss you and will forever have a piece of our hearts.

Advertisements

12 thoughts on “Love and Loss”

  1. Louisa and Family

    I am so very sorry for your loss I am sobbing now to lose a part of your family is so hard whether they be furbabies or humans and I send my thoughts and lots of hugs to you, I am thinking of you all and I am sure that Daisy will be looking down with love in her heart

    Helen

  2. Oh Louisa, I’m so sorry to hear that. My golden retriever, Max, has just stuck his head in the door as i’m crying and writing to you so i know just how much you will miss Daisy. Dogs do become part of the family and golden retrievers are the best dogs ever! xx

  3. Louisa, my heart breaks for you and your family. Losing a pet is never easy, but when that pet is so special to be able to help one of your children, it’s an even bigger loss. Our first cat came to our home in 2001 when one of my sons needed a furry body to love. Baby Jude lived with us until he passed away in 2013. Being there to say good bye wasn’t any easier. Your family will cherish Daisy’s memory, and in time perhaps a new furry baby will join your family. Hugs.

  4. Oh, sweetie, I’m so sorry. I was pretty much there 18 months ago with Byron, so I know how hard it is. But I promise you there will come a day when you can remember her more with smiles than with tears, and she knew how much you loved her (animals know far more than humans give them credit for). Wishing you lots of strength in these tough few days, and lots of love to you all xxx

  5. I remember what you went through when you lost Byron and I was so happy for you when you found Archie. Thank you. We did love her, so much and know that she loved us back so much more. Every animal takes a piece of your heart and gives you theirs and in that way, they will always be remembered xxx

  6. Oh Louisa, I’m so sorry to hear that you have lost Daisy. This must be so difficult for you and your family and particularly your son, who she befriended so well. Huge hugs xxx

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s