FAQs, Harlequin Mills & Boon Medical Romance Novels

Questions and Answers

A couple of months ago, we asked if there were any questions for the Medical Romance Authors.   And in response, you gave us some great topics to get our teeth into.

We set the survey up so that all of the questions were submitted anonymously, so this is our opportunity to say a big thank you if this was your question.  The forum’s now open to anyone who would like to discuss the topic raised a bit further, or ask any supplementary questions.  To get the ball rolling, three of our Medical Romance Authors have given us their thoughts.

But first, here’s the question.

How hard is it to think of medical situations that will flow really well and bring out emotions between heroes and heroines and the readers? I read a lot of medicals and love them and I love them because of the emotions and the medical issues that are covered.

Louisa Heaton  Sometimes it is quite hard to bring a broad range of medical situations into the stories, depending upon what sort of department the story is set in, of course. You want stuff that would really happen on a day to day basis (keeping it real!) and occasionally something that’s a little bit different and that little bit different usually requires a bit more in-depth research. Then you have to think about how that case will affect your characters. Will it be something that chimes a bell within their own lives? Or not? You want your medical professional to be focused on their patient and not too much on how that case affects them personally, because then you run the risk of that character not coming across as a professional. Also, you have to consider the cases you’ve used in previous books and try not to use them again, as certain medical cases, can be wonderful catalysts for certain emotions!

Susan Carlisle  For me, it isn’t difficult to come up with medicial situations. First, I think about the doctor’s speciality and find an injury that works in their field. For other scenes I just go with what could happen in everyday life, like sprained ankles, cuts, falls. The emotion comes from the characters working together. About how they interact, what they learn about each other. A sure thing on a medical scene is the male doctor caring for a child or older person. It gets the heart strings everytime.

Annie O’Neil  I do sometimes find it difficult to put the hero and heroine together in medical situations if their jobs don’t automatically put them together on a regular basis. I’ve just finished a book with an assistance dog trainer and a surgeon and really struggled to highlight working moments that would bring them together. What I ultimately concluded was that people drawn to the medical profession are in it to help people – and as such – any situation that would require them to unite energies to help someone would be a chance to explore their relationship further. Especially if their approaches vary dramatically. More sparks!

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FAQs, Harlequin Mills & Boon Medical Romance Novels

You asked… we answer!

Last week, we invited questions for the Medical Romance team.  We’d like to send a huge thank you to everyone who responded with their queries, all of which gave us food for thought!

If you’d like to ask us something, there’s still time and you can find the form here.  We’ll be answering all of your questions over the coming months, and today we’re getting started with the first.

Have all the writers worked in medicine?

The short answer to that is no – although many of us have.  And by way of a longer answer, we’ve asked some of our writers to give the low-down on their ‘other’ careers…

Amy Andrews
I was a nurse for 27 years and loved it from the very moment I first pulled my uniform on. Back when I first started we were still doing hospital based training and I went in as a fresh-faced 17 year old! I’ve worked both in the UK and Australia in the ICU setting and, until retiring in 2015, I’d worked in PICU for 21 years. Aside from my family, friends and writing, nursing has been my one great love.  (Amy’s photos are from the first day of her training and the last day of her training.)

nursey

Emily Forbes
Depending on which day of the week it is Emily Forbes can be found at her writing desk or at her other job as a physiotherapist. She works part-time in a large private practice with physios, doctors, nurses, psychologists, audiologists and exercise physiologists which is great for checking facts but it’s her patients that provide some of the best ideas for medical drama. She usually warns them that anything they say may end up in a book 🙂

Annie O’Neil
My history is more of a ….contributor to the need for health professionals. A lifetime of clutziness ensured many a doctor, nurse and emergency medical professional were kept gainfully employed. That, and the lion taming of course.

Fiona Lowe
fiona
When Fiona Lowe started her career as a nurse she wore a white starched apron, collar and cuffs. By the time she hung up her registration, she’d been a midwife, a maternal and child health nurse, a family planning nurse practitioner, a community health promotion officer and a teenage sexual health counsellor, and there wasn’t a starched anything in sight! A diverse career under the umbrella of nursing, it’s given her lots of ideas for books!

 

 

 

Annie Claydon
Before turning my hand to writing I worked in IT, where I brought databases into the world, undertook emergency surgery on them, and tried to make digital technologies sound like fun (the last with varying degrees of success).  Writing medical romance has its challenges in terms of getting all the medical details right, but the research is a fascinating part of the process for me, involving libraries, the internet, and most importantly talking to people and asking questions about the practical things.  I’m lucky to have had two careers which I love, and if anyone finds me chatting quietly to my computer screen, then put it down to nostalgia.

Louisa George
louisa

I worked for 22 years as a Registered Nurse in England and New Zealand, on wards, in research and in the community. It was a brilliant career, very varied and challenging, but I absolutely loved it and was very torn when the time came for me to focus on my writing. Oh, and I’m living proof that Mills and Boon Medicals are not all fantasy, as I met my husband (a doctor) on a ward where we were both working.

 

 

 

Louisa Heaton
Louisa Heaton has worked a variety of jobs in medicine, including time as a healthcare assistant in a large NHS hospital, a nurse in a private hospital where she got to assist in minor operations removing facial cancers and four years spent volunteering as a First Responder, answering 999 calls and providing emergency life support on scene.

Sue Mackay
Sue MacKay trained as a medical laboratoy technician, specialising in haematology. She loved the science and especially the diagnostic side of her work staring down a microscope. Boring for many people which might say something about her!! But she also trained as an ambulance officer so does also enjoy the cutting edge of medicine.

Susan Carlisle
susan
I was a homemaker for 10 years until my youngest son started school. Then I became a substitute teacher and did that for 20 years. I have no real medical training outside of raising four children. One of them does have a heart transplant so I learned a lot of cardiac care.

FAQs, Harlequin Mills & Boon Medical Romance Novels

Any Questions?

The Medical Romance authors have been thinking about new features to include here on the blog and here’s one of the ideas that was suggested.  We’re inviting you to ask us any question you like, and we’ll do our best to answer.

Your questions can be for the Medical Romance writers, the editors – or for both.  Although we’ll try to get your question answered by the most appropriate person, we can’t guarantee who that will be.  So if you have a question for one or more particular writers, please feel free to mention names, on the understanding that we can’t promise that any one person will be on hand to answer.  And, as always, we’re happy to give general advice and encouragement to aspiring Medical Romance writers.

We don’t plan to answer any questions in this blog post, but we’ll be running a series of blogs with our answers over the next couple of months.  You can hover over the ‘Features’ entry in the menu, and click ‘FAQs’ to see this post and all subsequent posts which answer your questions.

You can ask as many questions as you want, and whatever you want – a fun question or something a little more serious.  So if there’s something you’ve always wondered about, now’s the time to get us working on those answers!