Harlequin Mills & Boon Medical Romance Novels, New Releases

January Releases

Six new releases to get the New Year off to a great start!  We have a King, a Prince and a Duke – as well as Army Docs and two stories from The Sinclair Hospital.  Enjoy!

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Pregnant with his Royal Twins, by Louisa Heaton

New year, twin babies!

Midwife Freya MacFadden has stuck to night shifts since she was injured in an acid attack. But a hospital costume ball offers her the chance to hide her scars, and, lost in the moment, she seizes a passionate encounter with a handsome stranger. Leaving her pregnant…with his twins!

Desert prince Jameel Al Bakhari fought hard for his medical career, far from his kingdom of Majidar. And he’ll fight for kind and courageous Freya and their babies, too! But first Jamie must show her how beautiful she really is!

 
lgcover.9781488079467.jpgThe Surgeon King’s Secret Baby, by Amy Ruttan

A family by New Year’s Eve?

Reagan Cote left war-torn Hermosa thinking the gorgeous surgeon she’d shared a brief affair with was lost on the front line. So she clung to the child she was carrying.

While Kainan Laskaris’s voice is damaged, he’s alive. And when he finds Reagan in Toronto and discovers he’s dad to their sick baby boy, he asks her to marry him. Now he’s king of Hermosa, he needs a queen and heir, but before she’ll accept, Kainan must prove that marrying Reagan means more than claiming his kingdom.

 

lgcover.9781488079474.jpgForbidden Night with the Duke, by Annie Claydon 

One stolen kiss…

Nurse Megan Wheeler won’t let that passionate kiss, or the way she feels about Jaye Perera, ruin her dream job. Yes, he may be a duke, a doctor and devastatingly handsome but he’s also her future boss, and that’s a boundary she won’t—can’t—cross!

But working side by side under the Sri Lankan sun is a delicious torture. One that reveals to Megan a different side of guarded Jaye… After the hurts they’ve both experienced, can they learn to trust in love again?

 

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Tempted by Dr. Off-Limits, by Charlotte Hawkes

One night is never enough…

For trauma doc Major Elle Caplin, spending one night in Lieutenant Colonel Fitzwilliam’s arms is out of character but oh so good! It’s meant to be a one-off, until Fitz shows up on her army base!

Fitz doesn’t do long-term—he knows he’s bad news to anyone he cares about—and learning that he’ll be working with capable flame-haired Elle puts her in the strictly off-limits category. But with the memory of their hot, life-changing encounter keeping him awake, suddenly Fitz is tempted to break his one-night rule!

 

lgcover.9781488079498.jpgReunited with her Army Doc, by Dianne Drake

Can he trust her with his heart?

Army doc Caleb Carsten will do anything for his gifted son—even if it means returning to his hometown of Marrell and working for Leanne Sinclair, the childhood crush who once broke his heart.

Leanne is thrilled to meet Caleb again. But why can’t she remember more about their past, and what she did to hurt him so badly? And if Leanne can’t show Caleb she’s changed, will he ever trust her with his heart?

 

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Healing her Boss’s Heart, by Dianne Drake

Daring to love again…

When handsome surgeon Jack Hanson returns home, he’s not looking for love. His guilt over his wife’s death means he’s never going to risk his heart again! But feisty new employee Carrie Kellem can’t help but intrigue him…

Carrie’s tough childhood has made her independent; she doesn’t need anyone! Until she meets Jack… And suddenly Carrie wishes she wasn’t alone. Can she help Jack to let go of the past and see that he has a future with her?

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Harlequin Mills & Boon Medical Romance Novels

Words of the Year

This blog took a while to write (and my apologies for being late with it!).  Part of the problem was my topic.  The Collins Dictionary announced their ‘Word of the Year’ yesterday, which seemed to me to be a good conversation starter.  It was, unfortunately, also a cue for me to spend an inordinate amount of time doing some internet research.  Words of the Day, Words of the Year.  Popular words, and words which have fallen into obscurity.  Words which aren’t strictly speaking words 🙂 …

Because the Oxford Dictionary Word of the Year for 2015, was an emoji – the ‘Face with Tears of Joy’ emoji.  I remember a bit of discussion about it at the time, but I’m not sure that anyone can deny that emojis are now an established part of the way that we express ourselves.

This year, the Collins Dictionary Word of the Year isn’t strictly a word either – it’s two.  ‘Fake News’.  Amongst the runners-up my favourites were ‘cuffing season’ – which is apparently the ‘period of autumn and winter when single people are considered likely to seek settled relationships, rather than engage in casual affairs’.  As a romance writer I feel I need to work that into a book somewhere.  And ‘unicorn’.  I’m not entirely sure why that’s a candidate, but who doesn’t like unicorns?

I couldn’t find a Word of the Year from Webster’s Dictionary, but it I learned a bit from their Words of the Day – I’ll be sure to use ‘lagniappe’ (a small gift given to a customer by a merchant at the time of a purchase), at the first available opportunity.  And from the Macquarie Dictionary’s list of words which have been suggested for inclusion, comes the word ‘hepeated’, which is when an idea is ignored when suggested by a woman, but loved when suggested by a man.

And who could resist ‘Snollygoster’?  I don’t even need to know what that means to love it!

Everyone has their own favourite words.  At the moment I have a cold, so ‘honey’ and ‘lemon’ are pretty high on my list.  I have a love/hate relationship with ‘manoeuvre’, which I have spelled out on my fridge door, because however many times I type it, I never spell it right the first time 🙂  I think ‘rose’ is a lovely word.  And, for some reason that I can’t quite put my finger on, I like the word ‘impetuous’.  What are your favourites?

Harlequin Mills & Boon Medical Romance Novels

Going Back to my Roots, by Annie Claydon

When I was little, one of the first things our family did when visiting a new place on holiday or days out, was visit the churchyard.   I never quite knew why, but as I grew older, the reason why my Mum would stare at each of the weathered gravestones in turn, quietly making out the words on them while we played in the sunshine, became apparent to me.

My mother was orphaned when she was very young, and knew very little about her parents’ families.  And when she went to a new place, she looked for them.  However small the chance of finding them, she never gave up.

In my twenties, the search became a little more focussed.  Records became available, for amateur genealogists to painstakingly search through, and I used to go with my mother, helping her lift the heavy record books and flip through miles of microfiche.  Because we had very little to start from, we didn’t get very far.

And then, in 2001 the 1901 census became available online.  At last, we had a database – a searchable record, of everyone living in the UK in that year.  I applied myself to the problem once again, and found four families who I was sure were related to us.  It gave us a place to start when looking at the paper records and it was a huge and exciting step forward!

Over the years, more and more became available online.  One by one, the census records back to 1841 were digitised, along with parish records and other information and slowly I began to build a picture.  There were a lot of false starts and red herrings along the way – I learned that three separate pieces of information are necessary before you can make a definite link between generations, and that’s often difficult to find.  I also learned that just because something’s written down, it isn’t always accurate – in the days before centralised records existed, when information was given verbally, there were often spelling mistakes and sometimes a little deliberate massaging of the truth.

But finally we came full circle – although this time it was me who organised the outing and not my parents.  My mother and I stood in a country churchyard together, on a sunny day much like those of my childhood, deciphering the worn letters on the gravestone of her 4 x greats grandfather.

I know it meant a lot to her, and over the years the search had come to mean a lot to me. People who started out as just names and dates began to emerge as real people, as I put them into the context of where they lived and when, and what they did.  We didn’t have any lords and ladies, but we had something we liked much better – a diverse mix of miners, seafarers, shopkeepers, farmers, smugglers, shoemakers, schoolmistresses…  Families who were servants and families who had servants.

There were tales of terrible suffering – the woman who became destitute and died in the workhouse.  The mother who lost three of her children in one month, perhaps to an epidemic in the village where she lived.  Stories of endeavour – the young couple who left the poverty of the pit village where they were born, and ended up living on their own means in a prosperous London suburb.  And there was the family wedding where, between them, the bride and groom’s siblings numbered twenty five!  A family tree stretching back to the 1600’s in some places.  If the records indicated that some of our family might have been rogues, we couldn’t have cared less.  They were our rogues.

Now, I think that I’ve probably exhausted all of the available records, and gone about as far as I can – I was lucky to be able to find out so much.  And I wonder sometimes why it was so important to me to keep going, long after I’d answered my mother’s questions about her grandparents and their families.  But it was something we both loved – finding where each new generation lived and worked, and looking up the historical events which shaped their lives.  It gave both of us a feeling of place and belonging, and we found out that we belonged in a few places we’d never imagined!  It was a tale of ordinary families who’d somehow, despite all the odds, managed to survive through hundreds of years.  Theirs were the shoulders that we stood on.

And most of all, it gave us stories.  Even if there was no way that we could really know the reasons for our ancestors doing the things they did, it didn’t stop us from making a few guesses 🙂  My sister, who always stubbornly thought the best of everyone, made up sweet stories.  My mother, ever the pragmatist, imagined more practical motives.  And I wondered what I might have done in my ancestor’s shoes.  Perhaps that’s the appeal for me – as a writer one of the things that fascinates me is putting my characters into different situations, and wondering what I might do.

What about you?  Do you love your old family stories?  If you have any you’d like to share, I’d love to hear them.  Or, although one doesn’t necessarily exclude the other, do you prefer to look forward, rather than back?

Harlequin Mills & Boon Medical Romance Novels, New Releases

July Releases!

Six new books for the new month and whoa! Lotta babies around 🙂 Happy reading everyone!

The Surrogate’s Unexpected Miracle by Alison Roberts.

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Their unexpected family

Ellie Thomas was meant to be a surrogate mother to the baby growing inside her, but when her best friend abandons her, everything changes. The moment her son is born, Ellie knows she could never give him up! But the one person she can turn to for help is the doctor who delivered her child.

Dr. Luke Gilmore didn’t have a picture-perfect childhood, but he instinctively wants to protect Ellie and her baby. He was only passing through, but he may have just found a reason to stay…

 

 

 

 

Convenient Marriage, Surprise Twins by Amy Ruttan

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One wedding night…

When Lana Haole reluctantly agrees to a marriage of convenience to help persuasive and all-too-tempting Dr. Andrew Tremblay stay in the country, the last thing she expects is to fall for the arrogant playboy’s charms—on their wedding night…

Twin consequences!

Lana and Andrew agree it was a one-time-only deal…until they discover that Lana is pregnant with twins. Andrew won’t walk away from his babies, or his beautiful bride, so he has eight months to convince Lana to stay his wife forever!

 

 

 

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Reforming the Playboy by Karin Baine

From playboy…to father and husband?

Hunter Torrance, former Demons hockey star, is back—now as the team physiotherapist. And while team doctor Charlotte Michaels doesn’t believe he’s changed his playboy ways, the attraction between them is undeniable!

Hunter has worked hard at becoming a father to little Alfie, his newly found son. With Charlotte’s help, he knows he can be—though she guards her heart as fiercely as he does his. He’s sure they could be a family—if only they can take the risk!

 

 

 

Their Double Baby Gift by Louisa Heatonmedical3

Can two and two really make four?

Widower Major Matt Galloway came to London Grace Hospital for his tiny daughter. But he finds himself facing a barrel of emotions on meeting beautiful Dr. Brooke Bailey—his late wife’s best friend and single mother to her own baby girl.

Brooke can’t believe Matt is her new boss. But the feelings she has for him are even more troublesome. Brooke swore she would raise her baby alone, but loving father Matt melts her heart and Brooke starts to hope…could they really make one big happy family after all?

 

 

 

 

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Saving Baby Amy by Annie Claydon

Brought together…and bound forever!

Fiercely independent orthopedic doctor Chloe Delancourt will do anything for her teenage sister, Hannah, and little niece, Amy. So when Amy falls ill and Hannah runs away, Chloe steps in, with the help of gorgeous pediatrician Jon Lambert…igniting an unexpected attraction!

Saving baby Amy brings Jon closer than he ever wanted to get to another woman after his disastrous marriage. But Chloe’s determination and unwavering loyalty remind Jon of what a real family should be…and that this could be his chance to have everything—with Chloe!

 

 

 

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The Doctor’s Secret Son by Janice Lynn

The truth about that night…

Nurse Chrissie Tomberlain never thought she’d see the unforgettable Dr. Trace Stevens, father of her little boy, again. She hadn’t heard from him in four years, but then he shows up at a charity event and offers her another night of unbridled, no-strings passion!

Driven by his own demons, nomadic Trace has been saving lives in the world’s most war-torn places. He’s never wanted to put down roots, but then beautiful Chrissie turns his whole life upside down with one incredible revelation—he’s a father!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harlequin Mills & Boon Medical Romance Novels, Hot Docs!

Read all about it!

Here at Love is the Best Medicine, we always like to bring you news from the romance community. So when the ‘Six Hot Single Dads’ anthology, which includes stories from three of our Medical Romance Authors, hit the newspapers, we had to know more. And now we can bring you the inside scoop.

The trend for ‘Single Dad’ heroes was spotted by Mills and Boon earlier this year, and the six book anthology of Single Dad stories, with brand new covers, is available now in the UK from Mills and Book and Amazon.  It will be published in Australia in August, and is available for pre-order now at Amazon.  US readers can find the individual titles at Harlequin.

News coverage so far includes articles in the NY Post, The Daily Mail, The Telegraph and Glamour Magazine.

We caught up with the three medical romance authors featured in the anthology:-

Emily Forbes: ‘Falling for the Single Dad’

“It has been such a thrill to read these positive articles about our “Single Dad” books. I really love creating my heroes and I find there’s something special about my single dads so it is such a pleasure to know readers enjoy these stories too. A word of warning though – don’t believe everything you read in the media 🙂. In “Falling for the Single Dad” it is my heroine who is the army surgeon, not my hero although he is also a plastic surgeon. Abi suffers from PTSD and it is up to my hero, Damien, and his daughter, to help heal her.

My latest book, ‘A Mother to Make a Family‘ also features a single dad, Mitch, who is a cattle rancher and father of 3!”

Annie Claydon: ‘Saved by the Single Dad’

“Writing Jack and Cass’s story was such a joy, and it’s wonderful to be included in this anthology.  One of the reasons I love Medical Romance is that it gives me the opportunity to write nurturing and caring heroes like these very special Single Dads.  Being ‘on-trend’ isn’t something I’m often accused of 🙂 but in this instance it’s a real thrill!

My latest book, ‘Saving Baby Amy‘ is the story of Chloe and Jon, who take on the responsibility of caring for Chloe’s baby niece, when her mother runs away.”

Lynne Marshall: ‘Hot-Shot Doc, Secret Dad’

“When I wrote Hot-Shot Doc, Secret Dad, I never expected the story would be chosen for a “single Dad” anthology. It is actually a secret dad story, and one or more reviewers have mentioned it. However, I revealed the secret to the hero in the first chapter, and I loved how, after getting over the shock of having a pre-teen son, Trevor stepped up and expected Julie to fill him in on all the years he’d missed. Then he wisely went about getting to know his son step by step, only toward the end telling the boy who he was. My biggest kick out of being included in this wonderful group of writers is having my first ever “man-chest” book cover. 🙂

My latest book is ‘Miracle for the Neurosurgeon‘.”

***

And now for the covers…

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Lynne Marshall: ‘Hot-Shot Doc, Secret Dad’

Julie Sterling hadn’t wanted to return to her hometown. She hasn’t lived there since leaving thirteen years before, heart broken and pregnant. When she loses her parents in an accident she has no choice but to go back where it all began, and try to raise and protect her son.

Trevor still remembers Julie from that summer night all those years ago. The nurse and the doctor have changed a lot from their younger selves but even after all this time they’re drawn to each other. When Julie reveals to Trevor the true consequence of that night was a son he’d never known it’s the second time she’s taking a risk with the handsome cowboy.

And maybe this time their story can have a happy ending…

Life has a way of sometimes putting two hearts exactly where they belong in this sexy-sweet single dad second-chance romance.

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Annie Claydon: ‘Saved by the Single Dad’

It’s just crisis bonding. That’s what Cass tells herself. It’s just stress and exhaustion from the floods and long nights.

She’s not falling for the gorgeous paramedic she rescued near the river. She’s not thinking about what his skin would feel like under her hands as she patches him up with the first aid kit. She’s not listening to him showering in the next stall.
She’s definitely not thinking about how when she’s around him and his young daughter Ellie she feels like she can finally let herself have the family and love she’d tried so hard to make, and lost. They both think anything they could have would only be temporary— intense and fast.

But when her house is flooded and Jack— and adorable Ellie— invite her to share their house, Cass begins to feel like she wants to stay…

51PzeYOHUFLEmily Forbes: ‘Falling for the Single Dad’

Abi isn’t really one for believing in ‘happily ever afters’. The combination of spending two years working in Afghanistan as a reconstructive and plastic surgeon, and post-traumatic stress disorder tends to do that to a person. When she takes a job at a high-end plastic surgery clinic in Hollywood, all she’s thinking about is rebuilding herself and healing. There’s no room in her life for anything but surviving. Exceedingly hot or not, Damien would only be an unnecessary complication.
Especially since he’s a single Dad.

Abi resolves to keep her distance. Unfortunately this might be little difficult since he’s her boss and neighbour…

Excerpts, Harlequin Mills & Boon Medical Romance Novels

Excerpt – English Rose for the Sicilian Doc by Annie Claydon

9781474051507 This book almost didn’t get written!  I so loved doing the research that I would have quite happily spent all my time on that 🙂  But – as you can see – I did manage to tear myself away, and start to write.  And I was glad I did, because my archaeologist heroine gets to explore the beautiful island of Sicily, and solve a mystery.  And, to complete my writing bliss, she does so with the help of a handsome doctor!

Chapter One

The building shone white in the sunshine, a line of tall palm trees announcing that this was a place of some importance. Rose Palmer gripped her son’s hand, walking through the wide entrance doors and into a spacious reception area, refreshingly cool after the heat of the afternoon.

A building like this showed intent. Any archaeologist would tell you that buildings gave an insight into what a community thought was important, and Rose was no exception. The high ceilings and clean lines were a clear statement that the work that went on here was both vital and serious.

She hung on tight to William’s hand, for fear of losing him in amongst the melee of people who criss-crossed the space. She couldn’t see a reception desk, and she supposed the best thing to do was to ask someone. Easier said than done. Everyone seemed too intent on getting wherever they were going to stop and give directions.

‘Scusi…’ A woman in a white top that bore the insignia of the hospital stopped, and smilingly asked her something in Italian. Hopefully she wasn’t in need of directions too.

‘Inglese.’ Rose proffered the piece of paper that her friend Elena had given her, with details of William’s appointment, written in Italian.

‘Ah. Sì…’ The woman scanned the paper and shot a brilliant smile at William. Rose was getting used to the way that Sicilians always reserved their brightest smiles for young children, and so was her son. William reached up, and the woman took his small hand in hers.

‘Terzo piano…’ The woman gestured towards the lift and then thought better of it. Taking a pen from her pocket, she walked over to a water dispenser, leaning on the side of it to draw on the paper, smiling at William as she did so. Then she proffered the hand-drawn map, holding up her thumb and two fingers and pointing to the lift to indicate that Rose should go to the third floor.

Third floor, turn right and then the second on the left. She got it. Rose nodded and smiled and thanked the woman falteringly in Italian. William waved goodbye, and the woman responded cheerily, watching her all the way to the lift.

Upstairs, the corridors were less grand and more utilitarian. Rose followed her map, and found herself in a small, comfortable waiting room. A receptionist scanned her written directions and waved her towards the rows of chairs, before picking up her phone.

Rose made her way to the far corner, and sat down. She would rather have flown back to England to do this, but Elena and her husband would have none of it. All of the visiting archaeologists working at the dig were covered by private health insurance and this hospital was one of the best in the world. They would make the appointment for her and request a translator, and William would be in good hands. She was a guest on the island, and anything less would be considered as a lapse in hospitality.

And the one thing that Rose had learned very quickly was that you faulted Sicilian hospitality at your peril. So she’d accepted the offer and driven here, privately deciding that if the language barrier turned out to be more than she or William could cope with, she’d find an excuse to be on the first plane back home for a couple of days.

Someone laughed, and Rose looked up to see a man chatting with the receptionist. Her face was animated, smiling up at him in the way that women did when someone they liked also happened to be breath-catchingly handsome.

And even by the rigorous standards of the island this man was handsome. Straight, dark hair, grazing his collar. Smooth olive skin, high cheekbones and lips that were meant to smile. Rose couldn’t see his eyes, but she imagined them chocolate brown.

Only a man so immaculate could have got away with that jacket. Dark cream, obviously linen—on anyone less perfect it would have looked rumpled. But on him it seemed as if every crease had been carefully chosen and styled, to make the most of his broad shoulders and the slim lines of his hips.

Suddenly he turned, looking straight at her. His eyes were brown. Dark, seventy per cent cocoa, with a hint of bite. Rose dropped her gaze, embarrassed to be caught staring.

‘Mrs Palmer?’ He’d walked over and dropped into a chair opposite her. His voice was like chocolate, too.

‘Ms Palmer.’ It was a convenient halfway house for a single woman with a child. ‘Um… Parla Inglese?’

He grinned and Rose felt her ears start to burn. ‘Yes, I speak English. I’m Matteo Di Salvo, and I’m here to translate for Dr Garfagnini. He’s the paediatric specialist who’ll be seeing William today.’

Perfect. His English was clear and almost unaccented, although the slight difference in tempo made it sound seductive. Or perhaps that was just the way he spoke. Seductive just about summed him up.

Rose took a breath, trying to concentrate on the practicalities. ‘Thank you. You’re the interpreter here?’

‘No, I’m a doctor. Our interpreter is busy with some English tourists in the emergency department…’ He gave a shrug, which indicated that the matter shouldn’t be given a second thought. ‘Dr Garfagnini is running a few minutes late, and I wondered if I might take the opportunity to get to know William a little.’

Handsome and kind. And he spoke English. This man was a bit too good to be true.

‘Thank you so much, Dr Di Salvo. I appreciate it.’ Rose remembered that a handshake was usual in these circumstances and held out her hand.

‘Matteo, please…’ The caress of his fingers was just as alluring as the rest of him.

‘Rose.’ She snatched her hand from his, feeling her cheeks burn, and curled her arm around her son.

Harlequin Mills & Boon Medical Romance Novels

Together and Out Loud

Many years ago now, when I was studying English Literature, I arrived at the door of a tutor’s office with a friend.  We could hear the sound of a raised voice inside, and the scrape of a chair indicated that someone had leapt to their feet.

Reckoning that the tutorial had already started, and preparing ourselves for the embarrassment of being late, we knocked on the door.  But when we were called inside, we found our tutor alone.  In response to our puzzled looks (Had he just pushed someone out of the window??  The question was of some concern, since we were on the 14th floor…) he told us that when he was alone he often read aloud to himself, and with actions if possible.

The idea sounded a little outlandish to my inexperienced mind.  But when I tried it out, a lifelong love of reading aloud was born.

Reading aloud isn’t necessarily a solitary pursuit.  I used to read to an elderly lady, who shared my love of whodunits.  Together we worked our way through the exploits of Miss Marple and Sherlock Holmes, stopping from time to time to compare notes on who we thought might have committed the horrible crime in question, or to discuss some of the finer points of the plot.  Sharing these stories made us firm friends.

I find it a different experience from audio books.  Don’t get me wrong – I love audio books – but having someone in the room with you, maybe stumbling over a few sentences or adding gestures to the mix, is more personal.  Re-capping together on the story so far.  Watching someone’s face, as they read or are read to.

So when a friend asked whether I might read one of my books to her mother, whose failing sight means she can’t read for herself, I agreed willingly.  Little did I know what a merry-go-round of emotion I’d let myself in for!

I read for about an hour each week and have a very vocal audience.  I love the way my friend and her Mum have a tendency to shout You go girl! whenever the heroine sticks up for herself, or Noooo! when the hero decides he must leave.  They spur me on by telling me which parts of the book they liked best, and by sending up a resounding cheer when we get to the happy ending.

But it’s not all plain sailing.  I always read my manuscripts aloud to myself, but reading the finished book to an audience is an entirely different prospect!  The writer in me always comes across a few bits that I’d change if I had the chance, and I have a tendency to laugh in all the wrong places, and to grimace during the more light-hearted parts of the story, because I know what’s coming next.  Watching their faces gives me line-by-line feedback, which is always a little scary!

It’s their kindness that keeps me going.  When my friend and her Mum say that they feel good after hearing the latest episode of the story, it makes the work that went into writing it pale into insignificance, next to the rewards.  And the feedback they give me helps me in the writer’s constant quest, to make the next book better than the last.

So – writers, am I alone in finding reading my own books aloud both a scary and rewarding process? And readers, do you prefer the professionalism of audio books, or the flawed warmth of an amateur?

And finally – let me share the covers of my latest release, out this month.  I’ve long wanted to write an archaeologist hero, but I find that whatever a hero can do, a heroine can do just as well!

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Burned in love, Dr. Matteo Di Salvo knows he should stay away from single mother Rose Palmer. But as he gets to know the beautiful English archaeologist, he longs to chase the shadows from her eyes… 

Rose is drawn to the handsome radiologist, though after her disastrous marriage, getting emotionally entangled is out of the question! But as the sun-drenched island of Sicily works its magic, she wonders if she’s finally found a man she can trust…with her heart and her son.